Pablo Picasso-FABA
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SALON NUMBER 1

Pablo Picasso and the Cubist Legacy - Curated by Hervé Mikaeloff

 In 1904 Picasso settled in Paris, in a studio of the “Bateau-Lavoir”, where he met artists, writers and poets such as Guillaume Apollinaire, who would take part in the Cubist adventure. Two events were going to influence his reflections on the representation of volume: the Cézanne retrospective of 1907, and his discovery, with Matisse, of african art.

It is at this time that Picasso painted Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, one of the founding works of modern art. Though not quite considered a Cubist painting, it drew on the same sources as Cubism and heralded this movement. Now seen as one of the main art movements of the twentieth century, it is under the influence of Picasso and Braque that Cubism would develop into a movement that would transform the notion of representation in art.

Inspired by the teachings of Cézanne and by primitive art, Picasso and other Cubist artists broke with verisimilitude and reexamined the Western tradition. Cubism would undergo a number of successive developments. Early Cubism, under the influence of Cézanne, first gave way to Analytical Cubism, which delved further into issues of space and perception. It then moved towards an aesthetic reflection on the notion of the real, called Synthetic Cubism. These developments would foster various other movements, such as the abstract art of Piet Mondrian, the Russian avant-garde, or Futurism, for a while seen as a potential rival.

Today the Cubist legacy still pervades much contemporary art.

Picasso’s Cubist works are here shown next to works by contemporary artists who, through composition, formal research or the use of everyday objects, are perpetuating a movement which revolutionized our understanding of art and enabled many artists to break with academicism.